Pam Crosby

 

Featured Inductee

 

A native Oklahoman, Pam began her career singing jazz in New York City, where she sang in a band that included pianist Duke Jordan and bassist Keeter Betts.   Pam also sang with the New York City based ‘Sammy Kaye Orchestra’ as the featured ‘girl singer’.  She has been a featured performer in numerous Oklahoma jazz festivals. She has performed in benefits such as Divas for H.O.P.E., Follies Review, concerts at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame and ‘Summerstage Festival’ at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. She also toured the southwest United States with extended engagements in Texas, Louisiana, Missouri, Arkansas, and Nebraska. 

Pam is co-founder and president of the Tulsa Jazz Society. She co-hosts ‘Tulsa Jazz Society Presents,’ a jazz radio show produced and co-hosted by Leon Rollerson Productions.

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RECENT NEWS

AUG17

SARAH MAUD CELEBRATES SARAH VAUGHAN SUNDAY AT JAZZ DEPOT

            As one of the most prominent of the young musicians currently impacting Tulsa's jazz scene, vocalist Sarah Maud can be seen and heard around town in varied musical settings. One of the most engaging is Maud Squad, an inventive avant-garde trio that features Maud exploring the use of her voice as an instrument, in tandem with Jordan Hehl's bass and Nicholas Foster's drums.

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AUG10

TULSA MUSICIANS JOIN FORCES THURSDAY FOR JAZZ HALL APPRECIATION SHOW

 

             Unofficially, it's being called Pam & Annie's Hootenanny.

             Officially, according to co-organizer and performer Pam Van Dyke Crosby, “it's about musicians banding together in support of the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, because the Jazz Hall has done so much for us, giving us work and getting our music out there.”

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AUG5

DEAN DEMERRITT PUTS ON HIS BASS FACE FOR SUNDAY'S JAZZ DEPOT SHOW

 

          First of all, here's the reason for the unusual name of the Sunday concert featuring veteran bassist Dean DeMerritt and his group of equally top-notch jazz players:

            “I'm calling it Bass Face, because I met a great bass player out of Detroit, Ray McMurtry, in Atlanta one time, and he asked me to sit in,” explains DeMerritt. “I was kind of nervous, because he was a great musician. So after I got done playing with him, I asked him what he thought about my playing. And what he said to me was, `I've finally met someone who makes uglier faces than I do whenplay.'” He laughs. “So, you know what? I'll take that.”

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